Welcome!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss, share and private message with other members of our community.

SignUp Now!
  • Guest, before posting your code please take these rules into consideration:
    • It is required to use our BBCode feature to display your code. While within the editor click < / > or >_ and place your code within the BB Code prompt. This helps others with finding a solution by making it easier to read and easier to copy.
    • You can also use markdown to share your code. When using markdown your code will be automatically converted to BBCode. For help with markdown check out the markdown guide.
    • Don't share a wall of code. All we want is the problem area, the code related to your issue.


    To learn more about how to use our BBCode feature, please click here.

    Thank you, Code Forum.

Best low code tool for both self-hosted and web hosted with limited number of users

we5inelgr

New Coder
Hi forum,

I'm new to low code tools such as AppSmith, Tooljet and Budibase (etc.), but not new to coding...however, been away from it for several years now.

I'm building a small website that will have public facing static pages, but will have "admin" type pages that are accessible to myself and potentially an employee or two.

These admin pages will read and write to a MySQL db, using PHP.

The site is being developed on my localhost, but when ready, will be hosted by someone like Bluehost, GoDaddy, etc. I'm currently using Bootstrap Studio for the UI and looking for something to help expedite the middle and backend pieces.

My question is, what low code tool...if any, would you recommend for this situation?

Any most importantly, I'm wondering if anything developed using one of these tools can:

  • Be edited outside the tool?
  • Be run on a hosted webserver (i.e. Bluehost, etc) "on its own" or in stand-alone type mode or would I need to have the host company enable or install an instance of the low code tool?

Thank you for your time.
 
Hi,

AppSmith:
  • Pros: Open-source, drag-and-drop interface, connects to various databases including MySQL, supports PHP actions.
  • Cons: Limited customization compared to Tooljet, requires some Javascript/Python knowledge for complex logic.
  • Editability: Yes, the generated code is accessible and editable.
  • Hosting: Stands alone on your server, no need for additional setup by the host.
Tooljet:
  • Pros: Highly customizable, powerful backend logic capabilities, supports MySQL and PHP.
  • Cons: Not open-source, steeper learning curve, pricing plans can be expensive for small projects.
  • Editability: Yes, the generated code is accessible and editable.
  • Hosting: Stands alone on your server, no need for additional setup by the host.
Budibase:
  • Pros: Open-source, user-friendly interface, supports MySQL and PHP, offers some pre-built modules.
  • Cons: Relatively new compared to the others, fewer community resources and integrations.
  • Editability: Yes, the generated code is accessible and editable.
  • Hosting: Stands alone on your server, no need for additional setup by the host.
Based on your comfort with code snippets and desire for customization, Tooljet or AppSmith seem like good options. AppSmith is more beginner-friendly due to its open-source nature and drag-and-drop interface, while Tooljet offers more power and flexibility.
 
Hi,

...

Based on your comfort with code snippets and desire for customization, Tooljet or AppSmith seem like good options. AppSmith is more beginner-friendly due to its open-source nature and drag-and-drop interface, while Tooljet offers more power and flexibility.

Hi There!

Many thanks for the reply and information. I really appreciate it!

I believe I'm understanding these tools a bit more now.

Basically, any code that is created using one of these tools, does not create some kind of proprietary compiled code or hook or dependance on the tool itself.

Code that I develop with one of these tools can be "ported" or run on any server anywhere regardless of the tool being on the server or host company as well.
 
Most, but not all, low-code tools generate open-standard code. This means the code is written in languages like HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and PHP, which are universally understood and executable by servers regardless of the specific low-code tool used. This enables portability and avoids vendor lock-in.

However, there are nuances to consider:
  • Some tools might use proprietary frameworks or libraries: While the core logic might be in standard languages, specific functionalities might rely on the tool's proprietary elements. This can make full portability challenging.
  • External integrations might require specific setups: If your low-code application integrates with other services through APIs or plugins, ensuring compatibility on a new server could require additional configuration or adjustments.
Here's a breakdown of the mentioned tools in terms of portability:
  • AppSmith, Budibase: These generally generate standard code and are considered portable.
  • Tooljet: While Tooljet's core code is open-source, it uses a custom runtime environment for advanced features. Porting might require replicating this environment on the new server.
You can check the specific tool's documentation for details on generated code and portability aspects.
 

New Threads

Buy us a coffee!

Back
Top Bottom