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ramzez

Coder
Hi all,

I am new to coding (apart from some html/css stuff I tried when I was 16 or 17) and I've set my mind on making a carreer switch to IT. What direction exactly I'm still unsure about, because Software Developer, Full Stack Engineer and Data engineer all sound very interesting to me.

I started out with freeCodeCamp to begin somewhere and I'm also very curious about other coding languages. I looked up some stuff about Javascript, Python and C+, but I need to take it one step at the time, because the amount of coding information is overwhelming!

I will finish the HTML/CSS course on fCC first, then I'll see where to go next.

Maybe people here have some tips on how to take on this challenge of learning 'to code'? Or on how to find in what direction I should develop? All feedback and help is welcome!

~Ramzez
 

HadASpook

King Coder
Welcome to CF, @ramzez!

Take your time when learning to program. There are many languages and many concepts, but do not worry if you don't understand them all at once - they'll come as you move further and further.

HTML and CSS aren't programming-languages - they're mark-up languages(HTML is, anyway; CSS is just the icing and cherry applied to HTML) - but many programmers start with them as it allows you to tread carefully within the shallow waters of computer science and they're good languages to start with too. Note that each programming language has its pros and cons, and each is suited to different tasks better than the other(i.e Python is good for small programs and analysing data whereas C++ is best for heavier programs that perform tedious tasks).

For your career, what is it you most desire to make? Video games? Software/apps? Do you like reading and analysing data? Asking this question will help you to learn what skills it is you need for them. But, I must say, do not worry too much about your career. Programming is an art, as much as it is a job, therefore, learn to be a good programmer first with projects up his sleeve, before applying for jobs. You'll find a lot of advice online for being a good programmer, some good, some bad, as with all advice. As long as you ask questions, learn from your mistakes, and your code is clean and can be read by others, you're good.

Projects and analysing the code of others is how you learn. You'll learn new concepts and techniques, you'll make mistakes that you can learn from, and others will be able to give feedback on what you did best and what could be done better. Do plenty of projects - even small exercises from programming books are sufficient to learn from.

Best of luck and welcome again!
 

ramzez

Coder
Welcome to CF, @ramzez!

Take your time when learning to program. There are many languages and many concepts, but do not worry if you don't understand them all at once - they'll come as you move further and further.

HTML and CSS aren't programming-languages - they're mark-up languages(HTML is, anyway; CSS is just the icing and cherry applied to HTML) - but many programmers start with them as it allows you to tread carefully within the shallow waters of computer science and they're good languages to start with too. Note that each programming language has its pros and cons, and each is suited to different tasks better than the other(i.e Python is good for small programs and analysing data whereas C++ is best for heavier programs that perform tedious tasks).

For your career, what is it you most desire to make? Video games? Software/apps? Do you like reading and analysing data? Asking this question will help you to learn what skills it is you need for them. But, I must say, do not worry too much about your career. Programming is an art, as much as it is a job, therefore, learn to be a good programmer first with projects up his sleeve, before applying for jobs. You'll find a lot of advice online for being a good programmer, some good, some bad, as with all advice. As long as you ask questions, learn from your mistakes, and your code is clean and can be read by others, you're good.

Projects and analysing the code of others is how you learn. You'll learn new concepts and techniques, you'll make mistakes that you can learn from, and others will be able to give feedback on what you did best and what could be done better. Do plenty of projects - even small exercises from programming books are sufficient to learn from.

Best of luck and welcome again!
Thank you! I will just take my time and figure out along the way what I like.
 
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