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Python Which is a better method to start learning Python?

VLSkill

New Coder
I have 3 variant to start . First variant , it's to buy books on Python and study by myself . Second variant , it's take any online course from here or any other source , third variant to find mentor , but It would be expensive for me.
 
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menator01

Legendary Coder
I just do it for a hobby. I started with a book and online tutorials. Joined forums and talked with the people if I ran into a problem or didn't understand something. Obviously any classes with a teacher is good. For myself I just took my time and learned at my own pace. Sometimes I rewrite code several times before getting it the way I want.

I guess it would be what ever you are looking to get out of it.
 

VLSkill

New Coder
I just do it for a hobby. I started with a book and online tutorials. Joined forums and talked with the people if I ran into a problem or didn't understand something. Obviously any classes with a teacher is good. For myself I just took my time and learned at my own pace. Sometimes I rewrite code several times before getting it the way I want.

I guess it would be what ever you are looking to get out of it.
I think with a teacher it will be just faster.
 

cbreemer

King Coder
I think with a teacher it will be just faster.
Maybe, maybe not. Are you in a hurry ? IMHO, paying for or a teacher to learn the ropes of a programming language is so 20th century... There are great tutorials available like this one: https://www.w3schools.com/python/ It's well laid out and easy to follow. Having completed that, you'll have a fair working knowledge of Python. Then if you get into more complicated or specialized things, it is not too late to get a book on the subject in question, or seek some tutelage.
 

BorkedSystem32

King Coder
My preferred method of studying programming is to just read. Buy any books, but be warned, they're quite expensive. A good Python book I have is "Python Crash Course" by Eric Matthes: covers everything from the essentials of Python, OOP programming, and even has a few tutorials on using it to make games with PyGame, websites with Django, and even using Python for data-analysis.

If you want something for free, just use this tutorial from the official Python documentation site. Teaches you everything you need to know about Python with plenty of examples to work from.
 

BorkedSystem32

King Coder
Good stuff, thanks. Seems more inclusive than the W3C tutorial I've been touting.
No problem. W3Schools seems to get a lot of flak over accuracy and the outdatedness of their content. Now this was several years ago with old PHP, HTML4, Python2, etc. I only discovered this around when I began programming with HTML5, so they still carry a bad name, even if they have improved(which I don't know if they have).

Because of that, just don't bother recommending W3 and find tutorials from other sources. I even felt their tutorials to be lacking too in some aspects.
 

cbreemer

King Coder
No problem. W3Schools seems to get a lot of flak over accuracy and the outdatedness of their content. Now this was several years ago with old PHP, HTML4, Python2, etc. I only discovered this around when I began programming with HTML5, so they still carry a bad name, even if they have improved(which I don't know if they have).

Because of that, just don't bother recommending W3 and find tutorials from other sources. I even felt their tutorials to be lacking too in some aspects.
Well, no tutorial is likely to be perfect 😉 The W3C ones have always been good for me and I've never really found fault with them. Which doesn't mean there cannot be ! In a way, the W3C is like one of these shops that sell just about everything, in quite reasonable quality. But do you require the better and/or more specialized stuff, you need to look at specialist shops (like the said Python tutorial).
 

BorkedSystem32

King Coder
Well, no tutorial is likely to be perfect 😉 The W3C ones have always been good for me and I've never really found fault with them. Which doesn't mean there cannot be ! In a way, the W3C is like one of these shops that sell just about everything, in quite reasonable quality. But do you require the better and/or more specialized stuff, you need to look at specialist shops (like the said Python tutorial).
I always found they worked well for me for HTML and CSS stuff. I'm just going off of what others have said - to be fair, something always felt off when I went there but I don't know what.

I prefer more serious documentation(e.g. Python docs, K&R C book, etc.) because they go into greater detail as to how things work. W3 just doesn't do well in that regard I find.
 
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