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JavaScript Javascript Frameworks - Do you have a go to?

swift

New Coder
Nov 11, 2019
26
18
3
In js land there's a wealth of frameworks available. For me just of the top of my head I can think of React, Vue, Svelte, Angular, Ember, Alpine, Meteor and Backbone - certainly there's enough to overwhelm anyone just getting into working with javascript.

So my question is, do you have a "go to" framework when you're developing javascript applications? Why?

For me, I develop in Vue which is heavily influenced by my background in Laravel. I feel it fits well in my approach to coding, in that it feels very clean to get things done.
I do work occasionally with React and now I'm dropping jQuery in favour of Alpine JS where I'm able to.

What about you?
 
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Ghost

Active Coder
Apr 19, 2019
407
184
43
Not really - I need to start using them more for the sake of my resume, but I am glad I have chosen to invest the time into using good old vanilla (core) JavaScript. I have made tiny frameworks of my own, but usually for specific purposes.

I was a huge fan of jQuery, which is a library and not a framework, but I felt like it was making me lazy and taking care of too many things. Now I stick to Vanilla JS because there is something enjoyable about knowing exactly how something is done.

To save time I create functions, small libraries, and frameworks when a project is going to be continually developed for a while and for smaller projects I just stick to feature-specific JS.

I feel like I have become a much better JavaScript programmer ever since I ditched jQuery, other libraries, and frameworks because now I feel as if I can create anything at all. There is something really exciting about creating my own animation effects, toggles, dynamic logic, and other resources that I can reuse or share with the world. Another example would be how Angular makes routing and data handling easy, but practicing vanilla JS teaches you how to actually create those tools from scratch.

I guess I can relate it to baking your own break or cake with basic ingredients versus buying a box or bag of pre-mixed ingredients and flavors. Yeah, it takes more effort, but it feels more special. Not only that - I feel like the work I have been doing with core JS has helped my resume and allowed me to go do things like expand an existing framework or library. Instead of just using jQuery for example, I can now go create my own jQuery functions and addons because it is all just vanilla JS under the hood!
 
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joe

Coder
Aug 21, 2019
46
27
18
Not really - I need to start using them more for the sake of my resume, but I am glad I have chosen to invest the time into using good old vanilla (core) JavaScript. I have made tiny frameworks of my own, but usually for specific purposes.

I was a huge fan of jQuery, which is a library and not a framework, but I felt like it was making me lazy and taking care of too many things. Now I stick to Vanilla JS because there is something enjoyable about knowing exactly how something is done.

To save time I create functions, small libraries, and frameworks when a project is going to be continually developed for a while and for smaller projects I just stick to feature-specific JS.

I feel like I have become a much better JavaScript programmer ever since I ditched jQuery, other libraries, and frameworks because now I feel as if I can create anything at all. There is something really exciting about creating my own animation effects, toggles, dynamic logic, and other resources that I can reuse or share with the world. Another example would be how Angular makes routing and data handling easy, but practicing vanilla JS teaches you how to actually create those tools from scratch.

I guess I can relate it to baking your own break or cake with basic ingredients versus buying a box or bag of pre-mixed ingredients and flavors. Yeah, it takes more effort, but it feels more special. Not only that - I feel like the work I have been doing with core JS has helped my resume and allowed me to go do things like expand an existing framework or library. Instead of just using jQuery for example, I can now go create my own jQuery functions and addons because it is all just vanilla JS under the hood!
That's exactly my thought!

I never had a go to framework. I have knowledge of angular, react, vue and svelte but I learned them only to stay up to date with latest tech stack and for a better resume of course.

I create small helper libraries and get most of the work done using vanilla JS only.